Meet Your New Jays: Josh Roenicke

So yesterday we took a look at Edwin Encarnacion, the young third baseman acquired in the Scott Rolen trade.  Today, we'll take a look at relief pitcher Josh Roenicke, who will turn 27 on Tuesday. 

Roenicke was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1982, but grew up in Nevada City, California, where he was a three-sport athlete in high school.  Roenicke attended UCLA for both football and baseball, but soon concentrated full-time on baseball, where he was primarily a centre fielder but also did a little pitching out of the bullpen (like, 15 or so innings in his entire college career little), showing a mid-90s fastball.  Josh was drafted by the Cincinnati Reds, as a pitcher, in the 10th round of the 2006 draft. 

Roenicke, a hard-throwing righty, worked his way through the Reds' minor league system, showing good strikeout stuff (10.9 K/9 IP throughout his career in the minors) but somewhat erratic control (3.8 BB/9, fluctuating wildly, as is not uncommon for relievers due to the low number of overall innings thrown).  Roenicke made his major-league debut in September of last season and got into 5 games that month. 

Josh started 2009 in AAA Louisville but soon made his way up to the Reds, and he has done a very nice job in his 11 big-league appearances this season, with 14 Ks and 4 walks over 13 1/3 innings.  He replaced Jeremy Accardo in the Jays' bullpen and considers himself a potential closer but is open-minded about his role.  With a mid- to high-90s fastball and quality slider, there's no reason to disagree.  Though the Jays are taking a wait-and-see approach with Roenicke right now, they are open to the possibility of him closing at some point.   

Roenicke has baseball in his genes: his younger brother Jason (a 2008 draftee) pitches for the Jays' single-A affiliate Lansing Lugnuts, his father was a major-league outfielder who was drafted, in the first round, by the Expos, and had a long career with the Orioles (hence both Roenicke boys being born in Baltimore) and his uncle Ron had a 11-year major-league career with a number of teams. 

Josh throws a hard fastball that sits in the mid 90s and creeps up into the high 90s.  He also throws a cut fastball that moves a lot more than a typical cutter, causing some to call it a slider.  His mechanics are generally considered sound and he isn't much of a groundballer, generally getting as many outs in the air as on the ground. 

Welcome to the Jays, Josh.

X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

By becoming a registered user, you are also agreeing to our Terms and confirming that you have read our Privacy Policy.

Join Bluebird Banter

You must be a member of Bluebird Banter to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Bluebird Banter. You should read them.

Join Bluebird Banter

You must be a member of Bluebird Banter to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Bluebird Banter. You should read them.

Spinner.vc97ec6e

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.

tracking_pixel_9351_tracker